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Piñatas for the holiday season

December 20, 2014

The Spanish one and two classes at NCHS made piñatas to celebrate the holiday season. Spanish teacher, Mary Jane Fleming, stated “I like doing the projects because I feel students learn to cooperate and help each other . Christmas is a time of sharing and caring for our fellow man. Students learn and appreciate the work ethic of the latin culture and realize all the hard work, preparation and time it takes to make a piñata. They show how creative and original they are. They have a sense of accomplishment and show pride in their work”

 

Piñatas are part of Mexican tradition and are used at all kinds of celebrations. The history behind piñatas goes back as far as 400 years ago. The piñata originated in Italy during the 16th century and was used a part of a game that still around today. The original piñatas from Italy were known as “pignattas” and started out as nothing more than clay pots that people hit with sticks.

 

During the game, one person is chosen by the parties host and is blindfolded. The person is then led to the area in which the piñata is hanging and is handed a stick to hit the piñata with. The person gets three swings and if the piñata does not break open, the blindfold and sticks will be passed on to the next person.

 

In the Mexican culture, there is a legend that claims piñatas symbolize evil and the children symbolize goodness. Then when the piñata breaks open, the good beats evil and the world receives blessings, symbolized by the treats.   

 

The Spanish classes made piñatas to celebrate the holiday season. The students were allowed to make an animal of their choice for the project. There was also a piñata contest at the school. The judges are anonymous and  the judging is based creativity, use of design, neatness, use of at least two mediums and artistic quality. The winners this year were Alec Duryea, Isaac Ganstrom and Billy Mitchell in first place with their giraffe, and second place went to Gwyn Claas and Cailey Kaster with their peacock.

 

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